TRANS-ATLANTIC SECURITY RELATIONSHIP

Since the end of World War II, U.S. leaders have sought to lead their European allies and, as a corollary, frowned on any steps by Europe toward greater self-sufficiency in defense. Europe has wanted autonomy without providing adequate defense resources, while the United States has wanted greater European defense contributions without diminishing NATO and U.S. political influence.

VIEWS ON EUROPEAN STRATEGIC AUTONOMY

  1. ANDREW COTTEY, PROFESSOR IN THE DEPARTMENT OF GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS AT UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CORK
  2. RALUCA CSERNATONI, FELLOW AT CARNEGIE EUROPE
  3. CARME COLOMINA, SENIOR RESEARCH FELLOW AT THE BARCELONA CENTRE FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS (CIDOB)
  4. MARTA DASSÙ, SENIOR DIRECTOR OF EUROPEAN AFFAIRS AT THE ASPEN INSTITUTE
  5. OLIVIER DE FRANCE, SENIOR RESEARCH FELLOW AT THE FRENCH INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL AND STRATEGIC AFFAIRS
  6. JOHN R. DENI, RESEARCH PROFESSOR AT THE U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE’S STRATEGIC STUDIES INSTITUTE

CRIMEAN ASSETS ACQUIRED BY RUSSIANS SINCE 2014

After the annexation of Crimea, the peninsula's prized resources were identified and distributed among Russian oligarchs with connections to the Russian President, handing out everything from wine vineyards to hockey clubs to steelworks. Nationalization began in Crimea immediately after the annexation. Ukrainian state property became Russian, or rather Crimean, according to a resolution entitled “On the issues of managing the property of the Republic of Crimea.” The list of what was taken over is still growing. It includes thousands of businesses, apartments and land plots.

WHAT KIND OF A WORLD ORDER?

Source: Carnegie Europe

 Achieving a liberal and rules-based world order looks more like a dream than a realistic aspiration. However, there is great uncertainty as to what will replace it. China and Russia, the most powerful challengers of the status quo, do not propose an alternative model but rather aim at expanding their influence in the existing system.

CHINA TOP 100 TRADING PARTNERS

  1. USA
  2. Hong Kong
  3. Japan
  4. South Korea
  5. Vietnam
  6. India
  7. Netherlands
  8. Germany
  9. Malaysia
  10. Taiwan
  11. United Kingdom
  12. Singapore
  13. Australia
  14. Thailand
  15. Mexico
  16. Russia
  17. Indonesia
  18. Philippines
  19. Brazil
  20. United Arab Emirates
  21. Canada
  22. Italy
  23. France
  24. Spain
  25. Poland
  26. Saudi Arabia
  27. Belgium
  28. Türkiye
  29. Bangladesh
  30. South Africa
  31. Pakistan
  32. Chile

CHINA'S MAIN TRADING PARTNERS IN THE EU

  1. Netherlands
  2. Germany
  3. Italy
  4. France
  5. Spain
  6. Poland
  7. Belgium
  8. Czech Republic
  9. Greece
  10. Sweden
  11. Hungary
  12. Denmark
  13. Romania
  14. Slovenia
  15. Portugal
  16. Ireland
  17. Austria
  18. Finland
  19. Slovakia
  20. Bulgaria
  21. Croatia

TRUMP’S LEGAL TROUBLES

  1. Hush money payments to porn star Stormy Daniels, during his 2016 campaign
  2. Georgia election tampering probe: Trump’s  alleged efforts to overturn his 2020 election defeat in that state. Trump asks Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to "find" enough votes needed to overturn Trump's election loss in Georgia. Legal experts said Trump may have violated at least three Georgia criminal election laws: conspiracy to commit election fraud, criminal solicitation to commit election fraud and intentional interference with performance of election duties.

NEW RUSSIAN FOREIGN POLICY DOCTRINE

Russia has adopted a new foreign policy doctrine that prioritizes reforming world politics away from the hegemony of the United States and its Western allies and supporting countries that choose to fight neocolonialists and foreign interference.

HOW RUSSIA’S CONSTITUTION HINDERS PEACE

Author: Dr. Andreas Umland, Analyst with the Stockholm Center for Eastern European Studies (SCEEUS) at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs (UI)

There are numerous reasons why negotiations to end Russia’s invasion of Ukraine are unlikely to be successful, but one stumbling block is particularly serious and rarely mentioned.

POLARIZATION OF OPINIONS AND POSITIONS WITHIN THE RUSSIAN SOCIETY

A careful reading of popular Russian attitudes toward the war reveals important nuances that all too often are overlooked. First and foremost is the fact that rather than consolidating Russian society, the conflict has exacerbated existing divisions on a diverse array of issues, including support for the regime. Put another way, the impression that Putin now has the full support of the Russian public is simply incorrect.

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