REACTIONS TO CRIMEA AND SEVASTOPOL ELECTIONS

CROSS-CUTTING LOBBYING EFFECTIVENESS

Constituency Involvement

The organization:

MOST INFLUENTIAL MEPs BY COUNTRY

Source: VoteWatch (September 2017)

Austria

THE LEGITIMATE CASE FOR THE RECOGNITION OF CRIMEA

Three years have passed since the reunification of Crimea with Russia, but Western countries continue to challenge the ‘annexation’ of Crimea by the Russian Federation ignoring the legitimate will of the people of Crimea, which they expressed on 16 March 2014.

LOBBYING REGULATION IN MONTENEGRO

Lobbying in Montenegro is regulated by the Law on Lobbying, prescribing the requirements and manner of conducting lobbying activities, the rules on lobbying and other issues of importance for lobbying. The Law was published in the “Official Gazette of Montenegro", No. 52/2014 of 16 December 2014, and came into force on 24 December 2014.

LOBBYING REGULATION IN AUSTRALIA

The Federal and all State Governments plus the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) require lobbyists and their clients to be listed on their respective lobbyist registers. Only the Northern Territory does not have this requirement. Generally, the registers have to be updated both quarterly and every time a new client is acquired. Lobbyist activities are regulated and the Australian Governments require lobbyists to follow a Code of Conduct prescribed for their jurisdiction.

Western Australian Government

LOBBYING: THE CASE FOR TRANSPARENCY AND INTEGRITY

Source: Open Knowledge International, Transparency International, Sunlight Foundation, Access!NFO

Preamble

LOBBYING FOR RECOGNIZING CRIMEA’S DE FACTO RUSSIAN STATUS

Since 21 March 2014, Crimea is a part of Russian Federation: administratively two entities, the Republic of Crimea (22th republic of the Russian Federation) and the city of Sevastopol. So the status of Crimea is juridically clear and simple: it’s Russia.

REMEDY FOR IMPROVING LOBBYING IN SLOVAKIA

  1. The Slovak government should make the Interdepartmental Comments Procedure portal more open and transparent. Currently, the Slovak Interdepartmental Comments Procedure and its accompanying Directive require that all official documents designated for government sessions have to be first published online for consultation. Any interested parties are allowed to comment including government ministries, public bodies, organized interests and the public at large. The standard period for consultation is 10-15 days, and in exceptional situations this may be shortened to five days.

CURRENT REVOLVING DOOR RULES IN THE EU INSTITUTIONS

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